Everyone looks a little different in the evening

It’s interesting to observe how the colors of the late day sun affect a bird’s appearance. The Red-Bellied Woodpecker above that I spied on a recent early evening walk, certainly looked like he was enjoying the last rays of sun.

Boat-tailed Grackle

Boat-tailed Grackle

We usually see the  Boat-tailed Grackle above in his brilliant, shimmering blue feathers in the daytime sun. But yesterday, his feathers were transformed into a rust color in the waning sunlight. Frankly, he looked like he’d just accidentally fallen into a paint can!

Wood Stork

Wood Stork

Less than an hour after I saw that Grackle last evening, the deep pink sunset created a dark silhouette of this Wood Stork posing on one leg on a tall crag.

Limpkin

Limpkin

The Limpkin, tinted orange by the diminishing light at dusk, was squawking away as usual, and probably looking to impress his peers. He does a great job of making his presence known, as anyone who has a Limpkin as a neighbor can attest!

Ovenbird

Ovenbird

One of my favorite sightings this spring was the delightful little Ovenbird, who would always appear on my evening walks. I’ve never managed to get a really good photo of him in the dark and secluded little wooded area he frequented. He is a master of camouflage with his multi-colored body, and orange head stripe – he blends right in as he hops about on the forest floor among the leaves and twigs.

Since I often walk in the evening, and can’t bear to leave till it is literally dark (!), this seems a logical blog post in which to include (below) some other photos-in-the-almost-dark that I’ve taken of my wetland friends.

Have a nice evening~!!

IMG_7389

Green Heron

Sora

Sora

Juvenile Night Heron

Juvenile Night Heron

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American Bittern

11 thoughts on “Everyone looks a little different in the evening

    • Thanks, Aussiebirder! Yes, the Limpkin does sound like a human in distress at times – and it’s sometimes known as the Crying Bird. Honestly, I think the Limpkin’s eerie, piercing cry causes distress in humans if they’re close to an open bedroom window! I personally can’t see any obvious differences in their coloring during courtship, and males and females both work on nest-building and childcare :). I guess there are some behavioral differences, though, and the Florida Fish & Wildlife folks say, “Courtship feeding of the female by the male imitates an adult feeding a juvenile”.

  1. Beautiful images. It’s a joy to hang around as the light starts to fade, but a real challenge to getting good photos. You managed to capture quite a nice assortment of interesting birds.

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