Chasing the Blue-gray Gnatcatchers

How delightful that the “thin, squeaky call notes” of the Blue-Gray Gnatcatcher give away its presence – otherwise, it would be almost impossible to spot this tiny bird! (National Audubon Society Pocket Guide of Songbirds & Familiar Backyard Birds – East).img_4711This morning I heard that distinct nasal, wheezy buzzing in the trees all around me. All I had to do was stand still and watch  . . . very closely . . .  as these Gnatcatchers are literally in constant motion, flitting hurriedly from branch to branch and tree to tree.img_4725 The Blue-Gray Gnatcatcher “hops and sidles in dense outer foliage, foraging for insects and spiders.” (All About Birds). Once I finally spot him, more often than not, the Gnatcatcher is already heading the other way, and all I manage to capture with my camera is a tail shot!img_4734This slim, small (4-5″) bird can be found in woodlands and thickets, often near water, across much of the United States (Audubon). Lucky for us, they are in our region year round.

12 thoughts on “Chasing the Blue-gray Gnatcatchers

  1. Wow! What really awesome pics!
    How fortuitous for you that the gnatcatcher sat there long enough for you to focus and shoot. He remains on my shutterbug bucket list. Great post and thanks!

  2. You got great pictures! I have heard these birds at the salt marsh too, but up to now not really been able to spot them other than for a second or two, even less to get good pictures of them.

  3. Oh you are lucky, BJ, to have them year round. In northern Calif. we have them only for the summer, and I, too, chase them around, so delighted by this quick and perky bird. Excellent post.

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