Very quiet morning

fullsizeoutput_31a5It’s hard to believe that these very same tree islands were bustling with noisy (and sometimes smelly 😏) nesting wood storks, herons, and egrets of all shapes and sizes just two months ago. fullsizeoutput_31a7Almost everyone has moved on. This morning the boardwalks were empty and quiet and the ponds were utterly still. fullsizeoutput_31abWhat a tranquil time to take a walk and admire the lovely Fireflag 👆and Duck Potato 👇 blossoms~! fullsizeoutput_31a9Very few birds and very few people were out and about just after sunrise today – unlike the crowds we see during our winter ‘season’. But, lucky for me, this mama Black-bellied Whistling Duck headed out for a little swim with her ducklings just as I was passing by. fullsizeoutput_31ac Affectionately known as ‘bumble-bee ducklings’ (for obvious reasons), these little fellows are highly vulnerable in their first weeks. These two are the only surviving babies of the original 12 who hatched about two weeks ago.

22 thoughts on “Very quiet morning

  1. I see large flocks of birds with the purpose of migration, early in the morning. I imagine that must be more accented in Florida. Great shots, Carol. 🙂

    • Glad you enjoyed the photos, HJ, thanks! I often wonder where all of our species of herons, egrets, and young wood storks go after they fledge – there are so many every year, and most of them are year-round residents of Florida.

      • Many of those birds migrate south but not all, those ‘locals’ usually occur where they’ll live for many generations. 🙂

  2. Lovely serene captures and adorable Momma & babies, fingers crossed the two little ones survive! I’m feeling a little bittersweet with our area quieting down also, well, except for the Osprey teens who tantrums can be heard up and down the creek, but they too will be gone in another week or two.

  3. The name “duck potato” led me to more information in a Wikipedia article: “Sagittaria latifolia is a plant found in shallow wetlands and is sometimes known as broadleaf arrowhead, duck-potato, Indian potato, or wapato. This plant produces edible tubers that were extensively used by the Indigenous peoples of the Americas.” In Austin we have Sagittaria platyphylla.

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