Starting anew

Ever vigilant Red-winged Blackbird dad, fierce defender of his domain. (All About Birds)
Red-winged Blackbird mom busy keeping the eggs warm. She incubates her clutch of 3-4 eggs for about 11-14 days. (BirdWeb)
Unfortunately, nest predation is very common. Both eggs and chicks are in danger from a wide range of predators, including raccoons, weasels, snakes, raptors, and other larger birds such as crows.
It’s astonishing that the tiny, helpless nestlings will be able to leave the nest in 2 weeks or less!
This young Red-winged Blackbird with its soft plumage is already strong enough to venture out on its own a bit, albeit under the watchful eye of its parents. This little fellow was holding on for dear life as his narrow reed swayed in a strong breeze!

Hard to believe that birds often build their nests in places that are so readily visible to human passersby. These images were all taken from separate and distinct nesting areas – there are many this time of year.

31 thoughts on “Starting anew

  1. breathtaking!!!

    On Sun, May 23, 2021 at 4:06 PM Birder’s Journey wrote:

    > Birder’s Journey posted: ” Ever vigilant Red-winged Blackbird dad, fierce > defender of his domain. (All About Birds) Red-winged Blackbird mom busy > keeping the eggs warm. She incubates her clutch of 3-4 eggs for about 11-14 > days. (BirdWeb) Unfortunately, nest predation is very” >

    Liked by 1 person

  2. It’s a shame that many photographers pass more common birds in search of something “rare”. As your wonderful images attest, the Red-winged Blackbird, males/females/young, is a very attractive subject!

    Nice work finding different nests and documenting the life cycle of one of our “common beauties”!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I can only but marvel at the way these birds with just one beak weave these amazing nests BJ,. I loved the showcase into your Red-winged Blackbird.and the view into the nest. That was a an extra blessing. Enjoy your week my friend 🙂

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  4. How much fun to find one of these nests and observe the activities of the red-wings. Nasty predators…yeah everyone has to eat…but yesterday I photographed a couple of snapping turtles laying eggs knowing that overnight those eggs would likely be eaten by raccoons. It’s a good thing turtles live long lives so the few surviving young ones keep the number going. Everything in balance but it’s sad, in a anthro sort of way, to think of the eggs and babies not surviving. More cheerfully these are lovely images, Carol.

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    • Yes, the natural cycle of life does feel harsh sometimes …. We see something similar – softshell turtles lumbering slowly and laboriously off to a spot to lay their eggs, only to watch raccoons or large birds come and dig them up as soon as the turtles leave. Thanks so much for that upbeat final note, Steve! ☺️

      Liked by 1 person

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