White Ibis color transformation

fullsizeoutput_3109The White Ibis is ubiquitous here in Florida, a coastal wading bird that is seen from the Carolinas to Florida and up the Gulf Coast into Texas.fullsizeoutput_30c9Although the White Ibis is mostly found foraging for small crustaceans and amphibians in freshwater marshes, wetlands, and mangrove swamps, this graceful bird is equally at home strolling in urban parks and residential neighborhoods, digging for insects.fullsizeoutput_30d1While still immature, the White Ibis is actually a brownish-white splotchy-looking bird, like the ones pictured here. As with many birds, its color evolves as it matures.fullsizeoutput_30d0After the first year, the Ibis loses its brown color as its feathers molt into white, with black wing tips that are visible in flight (All About Birds).fullsizeoutput_3169No matter what color, the lovely blue-eyed White Ibis is certainly has a way of looking rather elegant!

13 thoughts on “White Ibis color transformation

  1. “After the first year, the Ibis loses its brown color as its feathers molt into white, with black wing tips that are visible in flight…” Bleached by the sunlight? 😉

  2. A most informative post! Thank you so much. I love the “elegance” in which you describe your Ornithological adventures!

    • Thanks – were lucky! Funny…. but I think the Ibis is actually too often overlooked. They are overshadowed by the glamorous birds like Snowy Egrets and by the grand and powerful birds like the Great Blue Herons.

    • I don’t think I realized how many reflections are included in these shots till you mentioned it – thanks, Donna! I love how the birds contrast with the color of the water.

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