Wilson’s Snipe Visit

Wilson’s Snipes are medium-sized, pudgy shorebirds with short, stocky legs. The bill is straight and very long (several times the length of the head).” (All About Birds). Wilson’s Snipes are one of the most widespread shorebirds, and their range covers most of North America.

I’ve only seen the species a few times over the years, but this quiet fellow can be seen at our local wetlands in virtually the same spot nearly every day lately. The Wilson’s Snipe favors wet habitats such as marshes, pond edges, flooded meadows, and fields, foraging in the mud for prey such as insects, insect larvae and aquatic invertebrates. The female builds the nest as a “shallow depression lined with fine grasses, leaves, moss, sometimes with overhanging plants woven into a kind of canopy” (Audubon.org). I hope this charmer stays around awhile.

24 thoughts on “Wilson’s Snipe Visit

  1. Awesome! Do they have many predators? How do they get food?

    On Wed, Dec 29, 2021 at 8:09 PM Birder’s Journey wrote:

    > Birder’s Journey posted: ” “Wilson’s Snipes are medium-sized, pudgy > shorebirds with short, stocky legs. The bill is straight and very long > (several times the length of the head).” (All About Birds). Wilson’s Snipes > are one of the most widespread shorebirds, and their range co” >

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    • They burrow their long bills into the mud or soft wet soil to feed. I’ve read that mammals such as minks and weasels are their predators. But here in the Florida wetlands, I’m sure alligators would find them a tasty snack. Maybe otters and/or raccoons, too, which are common here too. Here’s an interesting bit from All About Birds: “Like many sandpipers, a Wilson’s Snipe with eggs or chicks will attempt to distract a predator with an elaborate show of feigned injury, fluttering up from the nest and falling to the ground, or flopping on its side or breast and beating its wings.”

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  2. Wow, great close-up shots! I’ve not seen this species in the U.S., but we did get really close to a close relative, the Common Snipe, in Iceland, where they are indeed, very common!

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    • How fascinating-somehow I wouldn’t think of seeing a Snipe in Iceland. I found that several of my field guides listed the Common Snipe but not the Wilson’s Snipe. I see that they have different scientific names, but wondered if they were once considered the same species.

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  3. I’ve yet to see a snipe, I may have and not realized it, but I’ve received a few. Among some there is the idea that snipe’s are mythical and not real, thus an episode of Cheers. Handsome bird and handsome portraits.

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