The takeover continues . . .

The Wood Stork “… is the only stork breeding in the United States and was placed on the Federal Endangered Species list in 1984. The species was downlisted from endangered to threatened in June 2014, reflecting a successful conservation and recovery effort spanning three decades.” (many more details here: National Park Service)

The previously endangered Wood Storks have definitely found a new breeding ground here in southern Palm Beach County. Up till about 5 years ago, Wood Storks constituted only a small proportion of birds in this popular wetlands preserve. Soon they started taking over!!

In recent years, great numbers of these charming couples have been staking out their claims everywhere on most of the large tree islands. This month, the Wood Storks are busy flying off to collect building materials to bring back to their mates as they construct their large bulky nests (All About Birds).

This lone Great Blue Heron and Anhinga might just be reminiscing about the good old days when they and their friends had this nesting island to themselves . . . .

Apologies for being so delinquent in keeping up with reading and responding to my fellow bloggers posts lately! Life got overly busy there for awhile 🤗

26 thoughts on “The takeover continues . . .

  1. Wow! Tremendous!

    Yishai Rasowsky (972) 54-848-2245 (972) 54-751-6040 *Kollel *| Classes * | *Blog | GitHub | Linkedin

    On Sun, Feb 20, 2022 at 2:59 PM Birder’s Journey wrote:

    > Birder’s Journey posted: ” The Wood Stork “… is the only stork breeding > in the United States and was placed on the Federal Endangered Species list > in 1984. The species was downlisted from endangered to threatened in June > 2014, reflecting a successful conservation and recover” >

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Lovely to see Woodstalks nesting together BJ, these birds similar to Ibis, Egrets and Spoonbills appear to find safety and community nesting together. Good to see them breeding well, and that they have their own space away from humans to do so. Some birds such as our Spoonbills will abandon their nests altogether if they see a human approach.

    Liked by 1 person

    • So true about the community building we see on these nesting tree islands, AB. (Except, of course, that the Woodstorks are clearly the dominant species when it comes to selecting their favorite spots!) and interestingly, all of the birds that nest and live in our local wetlands are so used to humans, that it feels as if you could reach out and touch some of them.

      Liked by 1 person

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